Department of Landscape Planning & Nature Conservation

News from the Department of Landscape Planning & Nature Conservation

Networking as an important building block in the Upper Middle Rhine Valley Landscape Mosaic project (14.12.2022)
[Translate to English:] Ziegen und Ponys als Landschaftspfleger bei Oberdiebach. © Jörn Schultheiß

Networking with other actors and institutions active in the region is also of particular relevance in the Middle Rhine project in order to identify possible interfaces and points of contact and to bring together knowledge and experience. Discussions and meetings on site are important for exchanging ideas and gaining insights into different fields of activity and points of view.


Meeting with graziers

In November 2022, a meeting took place with the grazing initiative MittelrheinZiege of Mr. and Mrs. Maurer in Oberdiebach (near the project municipality of Bacharach), who practice landscape management by means of goat grazing. The animals keep former vineyard sites open and prevent the overgrowth and gradual bush encroachment of the areas through natural succession - a widespread phenomenon in the Rhine slopes of the region as a result of abandonment. African Boer goats and Thuringian Forest goats can also be used on steep slopes. In the large-scale, semi-open pasture landscape "Bischofshub", exmoor ponies are also used all year round as landscape managers as part of a project of the GNOR (Society for Nature Conservation and Ornithology Rhineland-Palatinate e.V.). The horses also easily overcome walls and terraced slopes and are suitable for extensive grazing and keeping slopes open. The grazing model offers a successful reference project that could possibly be followed up.

Participation in the dry stone wall building course

Dry stone walls are evidence of the traditional terraced landscape of the Upper Middle Rhine Valley, which was once characterised by viticulture and fruit growing. Today, there are still many of them on the slopes of the Rhine, but they are often in a state of disrepair.

In November, landscape planner Jenny Eckes took part in a dry-stone wall building course organised by the Zweckverband Welterbe Oberes Mittelrheintal in cooperation with Geisenheim University and the Rüdesheim Forestry Office. In Rüdesheim's "Krähennest", an old vineyard site below the Niederwald Monument, a historic dry stone wall was rebuilt. During the three-day seminar, Jenny Eckes gained a comprehensive insight into the traditional craft technique of dry stone wall construction and was able to actively contribute to the preservation of the historic cultural landscape. The Zweckverband Welterbe Oberes Mittelrheintal regularly offers courses in dry stone wall construction for interested people, and in this way several dry stone walls have already been restored and rebuilt in the project municipality of Spay.

Meeting with NatureFund e.V. Wiesbaden

NatureFund e.V. is particularly active in the development and implementation of sustainable forms of land use and is interested in possible cooperation projects. In November 2022, a meeting took place with the executive director in Wiesbaden-Erbenheim on a pilot project on dynamic agroforestry (DAF).

Through the multiple use of the soil, land in agroforestry can be used more efficiently and in a more diverse way. At the same time, agroforestry systems bring structural diversity to the landscape. Basically, a distinction is made between silvoarable systems (woody plants and arable crops/grassland), silvopastoral systems (woody plants and livestock) and agrosilvopastoral systems (woody plants, arable crops/grassland and livestock) (DeFAF 2022). Due to the resulting synergies, agroforestry systems are a particularly resilient and sustainable form of land use, which can possibly also be applied in the Upper Middle Rhine Valley project region. However, the special and partly extreme site conditions of the Middle Rhine Valley have to be taken into account and utilisation options have to be carefully weighed up.

Images

[Translate to English:] NatureFund e.V. - Pilotprojekt zum Dynamischen Agroforst (DAF). © Jenny Eckes
[Translate to English:] Trockenmauer-Baukurs im “Krähennest”, Rüdesheim am Rhein. © Norbert Sehmer, Hochschule Geisenheim
Competence Centre Cultural Landscape strengthens networking with water management in Germany (13.12.2022)
[Translate to English:] Martin Reiss bei der Beurteilung eines Fließgewässers © K.Adler

Water is increasingly becoming a precious commodity in climate change. With Dr Martin Reiss, the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape (KULT) at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences will in future play a key role in national and international standards for the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the protection and regeneration of the landscape water balance:


Water is increasingly becoming a precious commodity in climate change. With Dr. Martin Reiss, the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape (KULT) at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences will in future play a key role in national and international standards for the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the protection and regeneration of the landscape water balance: As chairman, he has headed the GB-10 "Water Framework Directive" expert committee of the German Association for Water, Wastewater and Waste (DWA) since November 2022. With this appointment, he also participates as a member in the DWA main committee "Water and Soil".

In Europe, the DWA is the association with the largest membership in the fields of water management, wastewater, waste and soil protection. It plays a special role through its technical competence in rule-making, education and information of the public. The approximately 14,000 members represent experts and managers from municipalities, universities, engineering offices, authorities and companies. The water industry is an important and central player in the cultural landscape. From KULT's point of view, close integration into the actor network on the cultural landscape is therefore an important step for the transfer of knowledge.

The focus of the work of the DWA technical committees is on the development and updating of the DWA rules and regulations, as well as collaboration in the development of technical standards at national and international level. As chairman of the GB-10 "Water Framework Directive" expert committee, Martin Reiss will in future chair the renowned Erfurt Talks on the Water Framework Directive. The implementation of the Water Framework Directive is a permanent challenge for water management: by 2027 at the latest, ground and surface waters in the EU must have at least a good ecological status - they are still miles away from this goal. Every year, the Erfurt Talks shed light on both organisational and ecological aspects of this. The field of tension between environmentally relevant requirements and the culturally shaped landscape always provides sufficient occasions for discussion.

News on the "Landscape Mosaic Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Site" project” (26.10.2022)
Former vineyard sites in Bacharach now appear overgrown with bushes. © Jenny Eckes

Site visits in the model municipalities


Over the summer months, the landscape planners Elena Simon and Jenny Eckes - supported by Eckhard Jedicke and Jörn Schultheiß - visited the three model municipalities of the project to get an idea of the model areas on site. In the further course of the project, exemplary measures for sustainable land use and design are to be implemented on these sites in the Middle Rhine Valley.

Bacharach, Lorch and Spay each have different starting points, challenges and objectives. While Bacharach, which is characterised by tourism, is primarily striving for a sustainable upgrading of fallow land, especially on steep slopes, for local recreation, in Lorch the focus is on the challenges of climate-sensitive viticulture on steep slopes. In Spay, there are already approaches to keeping open the slopes formerly planted with vines or fruit, which need to be further developed within the framework of the project.

Images

In Spay, slopes are kept open by one-year mowing. This has allowed species-rich rough grasslands to develop. © Jenny Eckes
Sustainable concepts are to be developed for overgrown model areas. © Jenny Eckes
Landscape metrics as indicators of bird community structure - A state of the art review (25.10.2022)
Graphical Abstract Landscape metrics as indicators of bird community

There are few empirical studies that comprehensively describe the value of landscape metrics as an indicator for biodiversity monitoring, taking into account different spatial scales, thematic resolutions, landscapes and species. These are the results of a current literature analysis, which the PhD student Katharina Adler at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences and Prof. Dr. Eckhard Jedicke, who supervises the PhD and works on cultural landscape development at the Institute of Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation, have now published in the journal Ecological Indicators.

The graduate biologist researches and teaches at the Institute for Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation in Geisenheim on bird communities in vineyard landscapes. She investigates how landscape structure and management practices affect bird communities. In their state-of-the-art review, they explore the use of landscape metrics in landscape ecology studies to predict bird community structure.

In order to use landscape metrics as a standardisable, practicable tool for biodiversity monitoring and as indicators for sustainable landscape development and conservation, future studies should be more transparent and detailed information on data properties that can influence landscape metrics should become standard.

 

Originalpublication:

Adler K., Jedicke E. (2022): Landscape metrics as indicators of avian community structures - a state of the art review. Ecological Indicators 145C (2022) 109575. DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2022.109575

Geisenheim Scientist Takes Part in International Research Campaign 2022 in Iceland (13.10.2022)
[Translate to English:] Gruppenfoto des Teams. (rechts nach links): Ragnhildur Þ. Magnúsdóttir, Iris Hansen, Gisli Mar Gislason, Peter Chifflard, Martin Reiss. Foto: Peter Chifflard (Selfie)

Environmental impacts of climate-related ice melt in Arctic glacier-fed streams

Global glacier mass loss has accelerated in the previous years. Between 2000 and 2019, glaciers lost a mass of 267 ± 16 gigatons a year, which is equivalent to 21 ± 3 % of the recorded global sea level rise.
The volume of glaciers in Iceland (in 2019) corresponds to about 9 mm of the potential global sea level rise. With climate-related melting of glaciers, water temperature is set to increase and the hydrochemical balance will change. Scientists expect that large amounts of carbon will be released in the form of dissolved particles, affecting the living conditions of organisms and, consequently, the biodiversity of such stream ecosystems. However, the exact nature of these changes for glacier-fed streams in Iceland is largely unknown as there are hardly any comparative studies of glacier-fed rivers in Arctic regions to date. The Geisenheim scientist Dr. Martin Reiss was invited to join the European research project “Arctic & Alpine Stream Ecosystem Research” (AASER25). 26 years ago (from 1996-99) the AASER research network (University of Leeds, University of Birmingham, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Science Museum Trento, University of Geneva, University of Iceland, Reykjavik) provided a basis for understanding how glaciers affect the biodiversity, hydrology, geomorphology, and water quality of rivers in eight European mountain regions. From September 20-23, 2022, a follow-up research project was carried out in the Icelandic river region Vestari-Jökulsá to study the biodiversity, hydrology, geomorphology and water quality in the area. The team consisted of Prof. em. Dr. Gíslason (University of Iceland, Reykjavik), Ragnhildur Þ. Magnúsdóttir and Iris Hansen (Marine and Freshwater Research Institute, Reykjavik) as well as Prof. Dr. Chifflard (Marburg University) and Dr. Martin Reiss (Hochschule Geisenheim University).


Beim Vestari-Jökulsá handelt es sich um ein arktisches, gletschergespeistes Fließgewässer, welches vom Auslassgletscher Sátujökull den Plateaugletscher Hofsjökull im zentralen Hochland nach Norden entwässert. Entlang des Flusses wurden vom aktuellen Gletschertor bis in das Tiefland Probenstellen angefahren und untersucht. Dies geschieht, um die Auswirkungen des Gletscherschwunds auf die flussabwärts gelegenen Ökosysteme zu dokumentieren, politische Entscheidungsträger und Naturschutzgruppen zu informieren und einen Beitrag zu künftigen IPCC- und IPBES-Berichten zu leisten. Zudem konnte Dr. Martin Reiss für ein gemeinsam mit der Uni Marburg gestartetes und von der DFG gefördertes Projekt (siehe: hs-gm.hessenfis.de/converis/portal/detail/Project/12116033) in die Vorplanung vor Ort gehen und die Zusammenarbeit mit dem Marine and Freshwater Research Institute und der University of Iceland in Reykjavik organisieren.

Kontakt:

Dr. Martin Reiss
Institut für Landschaftsplanung und Naturschutz
Kompetenzzentrum Kulturlandschaft
martin.reiss(at)hs-gm.de
Tel.: 06722 502 654

Literatur:
Aðalgeirsdóttir, G., Magnússon, E., Pálsson, F., Thorsteinsson, T., Belart, J. M., Jóhannesson, T.et al. (2020): Glacier changes in Iceland from∼ 1890 to 2019. Frontiers in Earth Science, 8, 523646. doi.org/10.3389/feart.2020.523646
Chifflard, P., Fasching, C., Reiss, M., Ditzel, L., Boodoo, K. S. (2019): Dissolved and particulate organic carbon in icelandic proglacial streams: a first estimate. Water, 11(4), 748. doi.org/10.3390/w11040748
Hugonnet, R., McNabb, R., Berthier, E. et al. (2021): Accelerated global glacier mass loss in the early twenty-first century. Nature 592, 726–731. doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03436-z

Images

[Translate to English:] Abflussmessung im Vestari-Jökulsá. Foto: Peter Chifflard
[Translate to English:] Am Gletschertor des Sátujökull (Hofsjökull). Foto: Martin Reiss
Strategy Workshop of the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape (10.10.2022)
[Translate to English:] Strategie-Workshop des Kompetenzzentrums Kulturlandschaft. von links: Prof. Dr. Eckhard Jedicke, Melanie Wielens, Alexander Peters, Dr. Maximilian Tafel, Jenny Eckes, Dr. Jörn Schultheiß, Elena Simon, Katharina Adler.

Since 2017, we have been working in the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape (KULT) together with our partners from funding institutions, science and practice on concepts and solutions for sustainable cultural landscape development. In order to successfully expand the work of the Competence Centre in the coming years, the KULT team of Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences started the development of a concrete strategy during a workshop at the Forestry Training Centre in Hachenburg on 28 and 29 September 2022. This is to result in a framework for action with concrete goals and measures in which all partners can work together on the most pressing issues of sustainable development of cultural landscapes in a goal- and practice-oriented manner.


Further workshops will follow to discuss the various aspects of the strategy with the KULT network and to gather feedback and ideas from the stakeholders. We will then consolidate the results into a strategy document. These steps will help to align the development of the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape and the work of all stakeholders towards a common mission statement.

Images

[Translate to English:] Strategie-Workshop des Kompetenzzentrums Kulturlandschaft.
Impact of glaciers on Arctic and alpine mountain waters (14.09.2022)
Proglacial stream Mída at a glacier terminus as the lowest end of the glacier Virkisjökull (Vatnajökull) © Martin Reiss

The AASER (Arctic & Alpine Stream Ecosystem Research) research network established a basis 25 years ago for understanding how glaciers affect the biodiversity, hydrology, geomorphology and water quality of rivers in eight European mountain regions. Meanwhile, glaciers around the world are melting rapidly due to climate warming and significant ice loss is occurring. The follow-up project AASER25 offers the opportunity to directly observe temporal changes until the end of 2022. Together with an international team of researchers (University of Leeds, University of Birmingham, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Science Museum Trento, University of Geneva, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, University of Marburg), Dr. Martin Reiss from the Institute for Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation at Geisenheim University will incorporate the results obtained for a study area in Iceland (Vestari-Jökulsá river basin) into a Europe-wide analysis. This is being done to document the impacts of glacier retreat on downstream ecosystems, inform policy makers and conservation groups, and contribute to future IPCC and IPBES reports.

 

Contact:
Dr. Martin Reiss
Institut für Landschaftsplanung und Naturschutz
Kompetenzzentrum Kulturlandschaft
martin.reiss(at)hs-gm.de
Tel.: 06722 502 654

Images

Glacier mouth in Island © Martin Reiss
Regional conference on climate adaptation at Geisenheim University: Drinking water too precious for irrigation (07.07.2022)

Water in the Rheingau is becoming scarce - consumption is rising.

First the drought, then the torrential rain: At a regional conference to mark the conclusion of the KliA-Net project ("Cooperations for Climate Adaptation in Winegrowing Landscapes"), more than 50 experts discussed existing and future water conflicts in the region at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences on 22 June 2022. Winegrowers like Gilbert Laquai from Lorch impressively described the existential problems caused by the repeated extreme drought. Two days after the conference, the flip side became clear: almost 30 litres of rain per square metre - not an unusual amount - washed valuable vineyard soil downhill through paths and ditches in Geisenheim.

How will we deal with our water in the Rheingau in the future? Christiane Wagner from the Darmstadt Regional Council, Department of Environment Wiesbaden, Mario Schellhardt, Managing Director of Rheingau Water, Jochen Quasten as Technical Operations Manager of the Geisenheim Municipal Utilities and Gilbert Laquai for the Rheingau Winegrowers' Association discussed this on the podium in the Gerd Erbslöh Lecture Hall at Geisenheim University. Moderated by Prof. Dr. Eckhard Jedicke, Head of the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape and the Institute for Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation at the university, they analysed the problems together with the audience and, above all, looked for solutions.

The increasing lack of precipitation over long periods of time in the Rheingau - as well as in Germany as a whole - is leading to a regional shortage in the availability of water. The situation is exacerbated during hot spells, when water consumption in the municipalities rises sharply. This is already resulting in supply problems today: The underground groundwater used as drinking water, our most important water resource with correspondingly high quality and strict hygienic requirements, will in future become too valuable to be used also as irrigation water in agriculture, in the Rheingau above all also in viticulture. In the discussion it very quickly became clear that the resource of water in the Rheingau has already been extensively tapped and that the amount of available water has been exhausted. Therefore, non-potable water is provided as so-called clear water for irrigation. For the future, the aim is to increase this supply; a clear water map that gives an area-wide overview for the Rheingau is the declared goal of the water suppliers.

In order to retain the still falling precipitation in the area more effectively, cross-terracing in steep slopes appears to be the best solution. However, from the point of view of the municipalities as well as the winegrowers, land readjustment is proving to be a major challenge due to the long periods of time required for implementation. According to the unanimous opinion of the participants, the state administration must be equipped with more personnel in order to speed up the planning process. In order to protect young plants from drying out through irrigation, winegrowers see the need for increased financial support.

KliA-Net has already taken an important step towards solving the problem, which was also mentioned on the podium: bringing together actors from viticulture and nature conservation and strengthening communication with each other. The regional conference at the Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences was the last networking meeting within the framework of the project on climate adaptation in viticulture using the example of the Rheingau region, which is funded by the Federal Environment Ministry. KliA-Net, whose project team is made up of staff from the town of Eltville, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, the Rheingau Winegrowers' Association and Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, has established a network of climate actors who want to implement climate adaptation measures in municipalities in the Rheingau region and especially in winegrowing.

All participants at the conference agreed that cooperation on water as a resource and on adaptation to the consequences of climate change must definitely be continued and expanded. The mayor of Eltville, Patrick Kunkel, made it clear that the municipalities in the Rheingau special-purpose association want to get more involved in cooperation with the existing project partners.

Information on the project and the results of the conference can be found at www.klianet.de.

Water conflicts in the Rheingau due to climate change (20.06.2022)

Regional Conference of Viticulture Stakeholders at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences

"Cooperations for Climate Adaptation in Viticultural Landscapes" - KliA-Net for short - is the name of the model project funded by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, whose aim is, among other things, to research and implement suitable measures to preserve the viticultural landscape with its functions and the vines in the face of growing consequences of climate change. A regional conference of climate stakeholders will be held at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences on Wednesday, 22 June 2022, at 7 pm in the Gerd Erbslöh Lecture Hall (HS 30) in the campus building, at Von-Lade-Str. 1.

The three project partners, Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy and the town of Eltville am Rhein have been working on concrete measures in cooperation with the Rheingau Winegrowers' Association and experts from the fields of soil and water management since the start of the project in 2019. They are exchanging ideas with winegrowing businesses on recommendations for action to counter the climatic changes in the winegrowing region. More than 200 stakeholders have already joined the KliA-Net network, including many winegrowers. In the past years, there has been a dialogue on new research results and practical measures to make the landscape shaped by viticulture fit for climate change at a total of five network meetings.  

The regional conference now taking place will also be the last networking meeting within the framework of the project, which is funded until the end of October 2022. This time, the focus is on the topic of "water supply", on which, after an introduction to existing and future water conflicts in the region, Christiane Wagner from the Darmstadt Regional Council, Mario Schellhardt from Rheingau Wasser and Jochen Quasten from the town of Geisenheim will discuss on the podium. After an outlook on the continuation of the KliA-Net network, the participants will have the opportunity to further exchange ideas over a snack and drinks.

The interested public is also invited to the regional conference. Please register online at www.eltville-marktplatz.de/veranstaltungen/ by 20 June 2022.

At www.klianet.de there is further information on the current project status, relevant studies and the opportunity to join the network - because it is important to implement and consolidate the jointly developed measures from the funding programme. Therefore, network members will continue to receive relevant information in the future.

Cooperation of Hochschule Geisenheim and University of Belgrade (13.06.2022)

AG Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation visits Belgrade


The Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture (University of Belgrade) and the Institute of Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation intend to collaborate in future in both teaching and research. In the spirit of intensive international cooperation, employees of the Competence Centre for Cultural Landscape (KULT) and the Institute for Landscape Planning and Nature Conservation, funded by the ERASMUS+ programme, visited the Faculty of Forestry at the University of Belgrade.

The two universities signed a cooperation agreement as early as 2020; due to the pandemic, the exchange between the two institutions initially began digitally. Prof. Dr. Eckhard Jedicke, Dr. Martin Reiss, Dr. Jörn Schultheiß and Katharina Adler travelled to Serbia from 23.05.2022 to 31.05.2022 to explore and profile the partnership. Especially with Prof. Dr. Jelena Tomićević-Dubljević and Prof. Dr. Ivana Bjedov, they had intensive discussions about possible joint courses, projects and doctorates. As a first result, a seminar for students on the digitisation of cultural landscapes in Serbia is planned for next October in Belgrade. The sustainable development of floodplain landscapes with forests, grassland and wetlands on the Danube and Sava, small-structured agricultural and forest landscapes of the low mountain ranges, the management of protected areas and cultural heritage were further topics during excursions and a visit to the state-run Institute for Nature Conservation of Serbia.

KliA-Net: Regional conference on water supply brings together viticulture and climate protection at Geisenheim University on 22 June (09.06.2022)

"Cooperations for Climate Adaptation in Viticultural Landscapes" - KliA-Net for short - is the name of the model project funded by the Federal Ministry for the Environment, whose aim is, among other things, to research and implement suitable measures to preserve the viticultural landscape with its functions and the vines in the face of growing consequences of climate change. A regional conference of climate stakeholders will be held at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, Gerd Erbslöh Lecture Hall, at 7 pm on Wednesday, 22 June 2022.

Since the start of the project in 2019, the three project partners, Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy and the town of Eltville am Rhein, have been working on concrete measures in cooperation with the Rheingau Winegrowers' Association and experts from the fields of soil and water management. They are in dialogue with winegrowing businesses on recommendations for action to counteract the climatic changes in the winegrowing region. More than 200 stakeholders have already joined the KliA-Net network, including many winegrowers. In the past years, there has been a dialogue on new research results and practical measures to make the landscape shaped by viticulture fit for climate change at a total of five network meetings.   

The regional conference now taking place will also be the last networking meeting within the framework of the project, which is funded until the end of October 2022. This time, the focus is on the topic of "water supply", on which, after an introduction to existing and future water conflicts in the region, Christiane Wagner from the Darmstadt Regional Council, Gilbert Laquai as representative of the Rheingau Winegrowers' Association, Mario Schellhardt from Rheingau Water and Jochen Quasten from the university town of Geisenheim will discuss on the podium. After an outlook on the continuation of the KliA-Net network, the participants will have the opportunity to further exchange ideas over a snack and drinks.

 

At www.klianet.de there is further information on the current project status, relevant studies and the possibility to join the network - because it is important to implement and consolidate the jointly developed measures from the funding programme. This is why network members will continue to receive relevant information in the future. 

Quelle: Pressemitteilung der Stadt Eltville vom 07. Juni 2022

Cooperation project: Geisenheim University builds dry stone walls in the Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Site (14.11.2022)
[Translate to English:] Trockenmauerbau in Rüdesheim vom 4. bis 6. November 2022 in einer alten Weinbergslage (Krähennest). © Norbert Sehmer, Hochschule Geisenheim

Rüdesheim. In a cooperation between Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, the Rüdesheim Forestry Office and the Zweckverband Welterbe Oberes Mittelrheintal (Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Association), a historic dry stone wall was built together with students in the so-called "Krähennest" (Crow's Nest), an old vineyard site below the Niederwald Monument in Rüdesheim.

Ten students from the Landscape Architecture, Viticulture and Oenology courses at Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences learned the technique of building dry stone walls and reconstructed an old dry stone wall in an old vineyard site, the so-called "Krähennest" (Crow's Nest), which belongs to the university as a teaching vineyard, in Rüdesheim from 4 to 6 November 2022. The focus was on preserving the cultural landscape, teaching and raising awareness of the old craft technique of dry stone wall construction, as well as contributing to nature conservation. The Krähennest is one of the last old terraced sites in the Rüdesheim vineyards and thus a testimony to the old, traditional cultural landscape of the Middle Rhine Valley.

Geisenheim University of Applied Sciences, located at the gates of the World Heritage Site, is an important partner for the Zweckverband Welterbe Oberes Mittelrheintal. A professional exchange is already taking place in various projects to enable a transfer from theory and research to practice. In concrete terms, an old vineyard wall has now been rebuilt by the students and under the supervision of winemaker Helge Ehrmann from Obernhof an der Lahn as part of a three-day seminar programme. "The UNESCO World Heritage Site is not only an important seal for tourism, but also obliges us to preserve and develop the unique cultural landscape. At the same time, World Heritage sites are also places of education for younger generations. We are combining these two aspects with this project," said Hansjörg Bathke (Rheingau-Taunus district), head of the World Heritage department, who saw the work for himself on site. Bathke expressed special thanks to the Forestry Office of Rüdesheim, which provided funds from the State of Hesse for nature conservation measures in the World Heritage Site for the project and thus made the implementation possible in the first place.

With great enthusiasm, several tonnes of stones were moved by the students and a collapsed gap in a larger dry stone wall was closed again. The course awakened enthusiasm for the preservation of the old walls among the budding winegrowers and landscape architects. A regular course is therefore planned for the following years and is intended to strengthen the cooperation between the partners as a building block in the long term.

New opportunities for the development of the steep slope landscape in the UNESCO World Heritage Site Upper Middle Rhine Valley:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4f43n4bW4eo


Press release of the Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Site Association

Dolkstrasse 19, 56346 St. Goarshausen, Germany

Tel.: 06771-40 399 - 30, Fax: 06771-40 399 - 49

Email: info(at)zv-welterbe.de

Categories: Competence Centre Cultural Landscape, Landscape Planning u

Geisenheim Scientists Receive Certificate as Visiting Professors in Ukraine (28.10.2022)
[Translate to English:] Dr. Martin Reiss (rechts) und Dr. Jörn Schultheiß (links) nahmen 2022 am „Visiting-Professor-Programm“ in Lviv teil und erhalten Certificate of Participation

Countless cultural assets were damaged or destroyed during the war in Ukraine. Before the war, there were about 400 museums, 3000 cultural sites and seven World Heritage Sites1 in Ukraine. These included, for example, the historical centre of Lviv not far from the Polytechnic University. UNESCO confirmed (by 24 October) damage to 207 cultural sites in Ukraine (88 religious sites, 15 museums, 76 buildings of historical and/or artistic interest, 18 monuments, 10 libraries)2. The war is endangering the cultural heritage and thus the cultural identity of the country.


For two years now, the National Polytechnic University of Ukraine in Lviv (Lemberg) has been cooperating with Geisenheim University. Together with the Viacheslav Chornovil Institute for Sustainable Development, the Competence Centre Cultural Landscape (KULT) of Geisenheim University works on topics of landscape development in Ukraine. As part of this cooperation, the Geisenheim scientists Dr Martin Reiss and Dr Jörn Schultheiß took part in the "Visiting Professor Programme" in Lviv and have now been awarded a certificate. Together with their Ukrainian colleague, Dr Maryana Senkiv, they offer a course on the digitisation of features of Ukrainian cultural landscapes and thus contribute to the preservation of Ukraine's cultural heritage. When reconstruction begins, such documentation can serve, for example, the proper reconstruction of culturally and historically valuable assets. This fits thematically into activities of KULT, which organises a nationwide working group for the system KuLaDig (Kulturlandschaft Digital) and is involved in several projects for the digitisation of cultural landscapes in Germany.

Link to content created in the teaching event: https://www.kuladig.de/Objektansicht/SWB-334742

Participation in the Visiting Professor Programme is a step towards internationalising Geisenheim's teaching in landscape architecture and landscape planning. In the future, joint courses with Ukrainian and German students are planned, as well as the integration of Dr. Maryana Senkiv into teaching at Geisenheim.

____________________________________
1. www.srf.ch/kultur/gesellschaft-religion/ukraine-zerstoerte-kulturgueter-kunsthistoriker-das-loescht-die-kulturelle-identitaet-aus

2. www.unesco.org/en/articles/damaged-cultural-sites-ukraine-verified-unesco

 

Images

[Translate to English:] Diese KuLaDig-Seite präsentiert KuLaDig-Objekte, die sich in der Ukraine befinden.
AMBITO awarded as Outstanding Example (22.09.2022)

"Awarded: AmBiTo project (www.ambito.eco) is an "Outstanding Example of the UN Decade""


"As part of the UN Decade Project Competition, the Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMUV), together with the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (BfN), awarded current, representative projects for the restoration, conservation or maintenance of ecosystems and publicised them. The awarded projects serve as best-practice examples and are intended to stimulate further activities for the restoration of ecosystems in Germany. The award has the significance of a seal of quality that contributes to the reputation of the projects." (https://www.undekade-restoration.de/projektwettbewerb/)

Development and application of a modular biodiversity toolkit for viticulture in Germany "This project is a representative project for the restoration, conservation or maintenance of ecosystems." (Source: https://www.undekade-restoration.de/projekte/ambito/)

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